Tuesday, April 24, 2012

ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA • Stray Dog Theatre

Stray Dog's repertory cycle of Angels in America culminates with Part Two: Perestroika, and it continues to impress.  The themes introduced in Part One: Millennium Approaches (you can read about that here) are plumbed even more deeply as the paths of Tony Kushner's cast of characters continue to cross, in the most remarkable ways, providing the connective tissue that makes this play a challenging but incredibly rewarding journey -- for the actors (whom I have the highest respect for), as well as the audience.

When we left off, Prior Walter (again, an amazing Ben Watts), suffering from AIDS and abandoned by his boyfriend Louis Ironson (Aaron Gotzon), is visited by the vision of his fever dreams -- the powerful and splendid Angel of America (a compelling Sarajane Alverson), who tells him that he must "prepare the way", for soon, "the great work begins".  This is where we pick up.

This Angel doesn't come with good tidings.  She comes with a prophecy for Prior, whether he wants it or not, and a plea for humanity to "stop moving".  In an arresting scene spiked with humor, The Angel explains how the migratory tendency of human beings drove God from heaven (on April 18, 1906 -- the date of the devastating San Francisco earthquake), leaving the Council (of Angels) powerless and alone.  Angels can't create -- they can only observe, and The Angel of America's mission is to get Prior, and everyone else on her part of the planet, to be still.  To halt progress.  So hopefully for heaven's sake at least, God will return.  Prior tries to make the argument that humans aren't rocks, so for us, migration and change are innate.  <-- Major theme going on right there.  Movement and progression are inevitable for the earthbound.  How we steer it though, is a decision heftily laid on us alone, cause it seems that God has left the building.

Sarajane Alverson (The Angel) and Ben Watts (Prior Walter).
Photo credit: John Lamb
Meanwhile, our "anti-hero", the famous attorney Roy Cohn (David Wassilak), is in a hospital bed, also ravaged by AIDS, although he sits on a dragon's hoard of AZT -- an early, VERY hard-to-get drug that seems promising in the treatment of the AIDS virus.  Along with facing disbarment on the grounds of unethical and unprofessional conduct, Cohn also faces his own spectral visits from the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg (Laura Kyro).  Cohn had Ethel and her husband executed for Communist activities in the 50's -- the first execution of civilians for espionage in United States history, and Ethel's hatred for him hasn't diminished over the years one bit.  She's on a death watch, and checks in with Cohn every now and then to give him updates on the disbarment committee hearings to let him know whether or not he'll die as he wants to -- as a lawyer.  Belize (Greg Fenner), is Prior's best buddy.  He's a gay ex-drag queen, and has a similar hatred for Cohn and all he stands for, but as his nurse, he's forced to deal with him.  And care for him.

David Wassilak (Roy Cohn) and Stephen Peirick (Joe Pitt).
Photo credit: John Lamb
Glimpses of the exceptional performances introduced in Part One are full blown now as more characters step into the foreground, starting with David Wassilak as the venomous Roy Cohn.  He really shines in Part Two, spewing out Cohn's rapid-fire malice while managing to evoke a little humor and sympathy.  Really fun to watch him.  Greg Fenner is again great as Belize, giving him a sarcastic but warm quality of wisdom capable of forgiveness, even for the people he despises.  Laura Kyro sets the stage as Rabbi Chemelwitz in Part One, and she provides the introduction again here, as Aleksii Antedilluvianovich Prelapsarianov, the oldest living Bolshevik, both to great effect.  But she's outstanding in her portrayals of Ethel Rosenberg and Joe Pitt's mother, Hannah, who flies to her son's side when he reveals his homosexuality to her.  Hannah crosses paths with Prior, and these two seemingly polar opposites strike up a friendship of sorts -- honest and compassionate.  "Polars" have a way of meeting up in this play, and the power and gravity of Angels in America seem to lie in the resulting lessons of these encounters that come to a head in Perestroika.  There's a stunning scene where Ethel assists Louis in delivering the Kaddish (a Jewish Prayer for the Dead) to Cohn.  Similar to Belize, Ethel proves capable of sincere forgiveness -- emphasizing a point Belize makes -- forgiveness is maybe where love and justice finally meet. <-- Major theme again.

Sarajane Alverson (The Angel) and Ben Watts (Prior Walter).
Photo credit: John Lamb
Speaking of justice, conservative law clerk, Joe Pitt (Stephen Peirick), has taken up with Prior's very liberal ex, Louis.  Again, strange bedfellows, although their stories are parallel.  They have both abandoned their partners, and Prior and  Harper (the abandoned ones) have a couple more less-than-lucent meetings of their own, one of them being in the Mormon Visitor Center's Diorama Room, where the trek to the "promised land" of Utah is displayed with 3D dummies.  Great scene.  These two, whom I think of as the "castaways", have arguably the biggest arc during the play, although most everyone seems to come full-cirlce to some degree.  Prior finds a strength he didn't know he had, and Harper (Rachel Hanks) finds the courage to move on with optimism.  Perhaps without her delusional travel agent, "Mr. Lies".

The creative team also continue their notable turns and contribute admirably, along with the sure-handed direction of Gary Bell.

This is a play that I can now gladly say, "I've seen it onstage".  Again, it's not to be missed.  This is also one of the hardest things I've ever had to write about.  Why?  Because it's intimidating as fuck, that's why.  But I have the highest admiration for the cast and crew for their obvious commitment, and this is truly a production that has miraculous experiences in store.  See it.  You won't be sorry.


ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA

Written by Tony Kushner
Directed by Gary F. Bell
Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Ave.
through May 19 | tickets: $18 - $20; two show season tickets: $33 - $37
Thursday – Saturday at 7:30pm.  This production will have no matinee performances.  Both parts presented in repertory.

Part One: Millennium Approaches
April 12 to 14, April 26 to 28, May 10 to 12.

Part Two: Perestroika
April 19 to 21, May 3 to 5, May 17 to 19.

Cast:
Ben Watts (Prior Walter/The Man in the Park), Aaron Gotzon (Louis Ironson/The Angel Australia/Sarah Ironson), Rachel Hanks (Harper Pitt/Martin Heller/The Angel Africa), Stephen Peirick (Joe Pitt/The Ghost of Prior I/The Eskimo/The Mormon Father/The Angel Europa), Laura Kyro (Hannah Pitt/Rabbi Isidor Chemelwitz/Henry/Ethel Rosenberg/Aleksii Antedilluvianovich Prelapsarianov/The Angel Asiatica), Greg Fenner (Belize/Mr. Lies/The Mormon Son, Caleb/The Angel Oceania), Sarajane Alverson (The Angel/Emily/Sister Ella Chapter/The Woman in the South Bronx/The Mormon Mother/The Mormon Son, Orrin) and David Wassilak (Roy Cohn/The Ghost of Prior II/The Angel Antarctica).

Creative:
Projection, scenic and sound design by Justin Been; costume design by Alexandra Scibetta Quigley; lighting design by Tyler Duenow; dramaturg, Nikki Lott; stage manager, Justin Been.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

ANGELS IN AMERICA PART ONE: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES • Stray Dog Theatre

"Prepare the way…" -- a supernatural admonition given to a young man in 1985, new to his first lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma, a devastating indication of the AIDS virus.  Meanwhile, a valium-addicted housewife calls on "Mr. Lies", her hallucinogen-induced travel agent, ready to take her wherever she needs to go, for an escape from her phobias and suspicions about her husband, Joe.  Across town, Ethel Rosenberg, a woman executed for being a Communist spy in 1953, appears as a ghost to Roy Cohn, a right-wing closeted lawyer, chiefly responsible for putting the Rosenbergs in the chair.  He counts this among his major accomplishments.  He's also infected with AIDS.

The scope Tony Kushner's Pulitzer Prize, Tony Award winning two-part epic, subtitled "A Gay Fantasia on National Themes", is broad.  Incorporating the topics of AIDS, religion, death, politics, corruption, and then some, with a few supernatural visits thrown in, could seem over-whelming, if not for Kushner's ability to bring all of these subjects down to a common denominator.  A responsive chord that brings Reagan-Era philosophies and the hopeless devastation of the AIDS virus together under the ageless umbrella of an undeniable humanity.

Stray Dog Theatre's latest offering, Angels in America, in an already ambitious season, is very impressive under Gary Bell's magnificent direction, and will be presented with both parts -- Part One: Millennium Approaches and Part Two: Perestroika, in weekly repertory.  A rare treat.

Aaron Paul Gotzon (Louis Ironson) and Ben Watts (Prior Walter).
Photo credit: John Lamb
As wide as the landscape of this play is, it begins with an intimate introduction of two couples and their parallel unraveling.  Louis (Aaron Gotzon) is a Jewish word processor and fierce liberal, having a very hard time coping with his boyfriend Prior's (Ben Watts) first indications of AIDS.  Then we have a Mormon couple, Joe (Stephen Peirick) and Harper (Rachel Hanks).  Joe is a Republican law clerk, struggling with his sexual identity.  His ambitions for a higher position in the Justice Department are hindered by his wife Harper, a valium-addicted open wound, tangled in a marriage that's more platonic than anything else.  Louis and Joe meet at work and the "castaways", Prior and Harper, meet each other in a dream.  Well, Prior's fever dream and Harper's hallucination.

Rachel Hanks (Harper Pitt)
and Stephen Peirick (Joe Pitt).
Photo credit: John Lamb
The performances of these four central characters were pretty strong across the board.  Ben Watts leads the pack as a superb Prior, full of the courage he doesn't know he has yet.  It took Gotzon's Louis a little longer to really settle in, but once he does, it's very rewarding.  Peirick's Joe Pitt makes you feel like he has the weight of the world on his shoulders, and Hanks as his wife Harper evokes sympathy as one who seems to have only a tenuous at best grasp on her surroundings.

From these two couples, we meet the associated cast of characters.  David Wassilak is delicious as the caustic aforementioned Roy Cohn, the personification of Reagan-era greed.  Greg Fenner is wonderful as ex-drag queen, Belize, a registered nurse and Prior's best buddy, as well as "Mr. Lies".  Laura Kyro delivers a wonderful turn as the Rabbi in the beginning, and later as Hannah, Joe's mom, who sells her house in Utah to go to her son in NYC to look after him and his wife.  The excellent and versatile Sarajane Alverson plays Prior's nurse, a deranged woman in the Bronx, and gives us a glorious snippet of "The Angel of America" at the end.  Before it's all over, this cast of eight will inhabit multiple roles, a couple as many as five or six, often crossing gender lines, and if Part One is any indication, Part Two will also be stunning.

Great use is made of the space at Tower Grove Abbey, and the creative team brought it.  Justin Been's beautiful scenic design incorporating many locations, and his backdrop of various textures, along with his additional contributions of projection and sound design are pitch-perfect.  He must have an "S" on his chest or something.  Tyler Duenow's lighting design perfectly spotlights the action -- there are a few scenes back-and-forth between the couples where one is lit and the other couple remains fixed in tableaus in the shadows.  Love...  Alexandra Scibetta Quigley's costume design is also spot-on.

Rachel Hanks (Martin Heller), David Wassilak (Roy Cohn),
and Stephen Peirick (Joe Pitt).
Photo credit: John Lamb
I had only seen the HBO mini-series of this play and honestly, was a little nervous  about seeing the production as it was intended -- onstage.  Well, onstage is better.  Why?  Duh, visceral experiences!  This intimate presentation exemplifies my favorite thing about theatre -- it's in your face.  A completely engrossing experience.  Get your tickets now.  Seriously.  Again, the opportunity to see both parts of Angels in America is a rare treat NOT to be missed.  It's long, yes.  But more than worth the time and money.  Basically, if you love some theatre, and you let this play pass you by, well…  you're stupid.  Ha!  Just kidding.  Kinda…

Remember, performances begin at 7:30pm.


Ben Watts (Prior Walter) and Greg Fenner (Belize).
Photo credit: John Lamb
ANGELS IN AMERICA PART ONE: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES

Written by Tony Kushner
Directed by Gary F. Bell
Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Ave.
through May 12 | tickets: $18 - $20; two show season tickets: $33 - $37
Thursday – Saturday at 7:30pm.  This production will have no matinee performances.  Both parts presented in repertory.

Part One: Millennium Approaches
April 12 to 14, April 26 to 28, May 10 to 12.

Part Two: Perestroika
April 19 to 21, May 3 to 5, May 17 to 19.

Cast:
Ben Watts (Prior Walter/The Man in the Park), Aaron Gotzon (Louis Ironson/The Angel Australia/Sarah Ironson), Rachel Hanks (Harper Pitt/Martin Heller/The Angel Africa), Stephen Peirick (Joe Pitt/The Ghost of Prior I/The Eskimo/The Mormon Father/The Angel Europa), Laura Kyro (Hannah Pitt/Rabbi Isidor Chemelwitz/Henry/Ethel Rosenberg/Aleksii Antedilluvianovich Prelapsarianov/The Angel Asiatica), Greg Fenner (Belize/Mr. Lies/The Mormon Son, Caleb/The Angel Oceania), Sarajane Alverson (The Angel/Emily/Sister Ella Chapter/The Woman in the South Bronx/The Mormon Mother/The Mormon Son, Orrin) and David Wassilak (Roy Cohn/The Ghost of Prior II/The Angel Antarctica).

Creative:
Projection, scenic and sound design by Justin Been; costume design by Alexandra Scibetta Quigley; lighting design by Tyler Duenow; dramaturg, Nikki Lott; stage manager, Justin Been.

Monday, April 9, 2012

KILLER JOE • St. Louis Actors' Studio

This first play from Tracy Letts takes a look at the Smiths -- a brood that gives the phrase "trailer trash" a whole new meaning.  Killer Joe is the third play I've seen from Letts and so far, they all have this flavor of damage mixed with dark comedy.  Like sour candy or bitter chocolate…  …  You know what I'm sayin'.  At any rate, under Milton Zoth's direction, it's a hearty blend going on right now at Actors' Studio.

The swastika tattooed son of the Smith family, Chris (James E. Slover), is in debt to some tough guys for thousands of bucks he doesn't have.  His wounded, naive little sister Dottie (Rachel Fenton) walks and talks in her sleep, and his dad Ansel (Larry Dell), whom Chris shares joints and Stag beer with, doesn't care about much outside of old detective shows on television.  In addition, they all look like they kinda don't shower very often.  Sharla (Missy Miller) is Ansel's new but maybe not so improved wife.  When her stepson asks why she answered the door half-naked, she replies, "Well, it's the middle of the night!  I didn't know who you were!".  Yep.  A nice bunch.

Jason Cannon (Killer Joe Cooper), Rachel Fenton (Dottie Smith),
Larry Dell (Ansel Smith), Missy Miller (Sharla Smith)
and James E. Slover (Chris Smith).
Photo credit: John Lamb
Chris decides that an end to the squalor of this family could be gained by one act -- killing his dad's ex-wife, his and Dottie's mother Adele, and splitting the insurance money.  Now, according to Dottie's accounts, Adele really is a miserable bitch, but still.  Chris hires Killer Joe Cooper, a Dallas police officer who "exterminates" on the side, to off the matriarch of the family.  Chris plans to pay Joe from a portion of the insurance policy proceeds, a policy where Dottie is the beneficiary.  But with no money for even the down payment, Killer Joe insists on a retainer.  "Retainer" -- a word among a catalogue of words and phrases that Chris and his dad don't understand.  They really are so stupid, it's hilarious.  Anyway, giving too much away would spoil the fun of this foul thrill ride, but let's just say that the Smiths have got to be one of the most fucked up families in Texas.

Make no mistake, in spite of, or because of its premise, this play is intensely funny -- it's basically a comedy, although it's a dark one.  It contains serious language, nudity, and naughty things involving a KFC drumstick, so I would leave the kids at home.

Jason Cannon (Killer Joe Cooper)
and Rachel Fenton (Dottie Smith).
Photo credit: John Lamb
The whole cast was very impressive.  James E. Slover's Chris Smith and Larry Dell as his dad Ansel don't seem to have half a brain between them.  While their braying back-and-forth is very funny, it was just a little tentative when I saw it, but these guys inhabited their characters well and I have no doubt the pacing will tighten up as the run continues.  Missy Miller's Sharla Smith delivers a lot of comic relief early on, but plays a much more serious part later, and Miller spans that gap wonderfully.  Jason Cannon gives Killer Joe Cooper a steely quality that's hard to resist.  As corrupt as he is, Cannon's Killer Joe displays a polite, calm but threatening self-assured presence that takes you from the minute he walks onstage.  He also comes off as the most intelligent one in this group.  You can understand why Rachel Fenton's Dottie Smith falls for him.  Fenton delivers a subtle, quiet, courageous performance as Dottie, who notes that Joe's "eyes hurt".  She's a bit of a wallflower, getting lost in the background at first, but once she takes center stage, Fenton's performance, while still submissive, is commanding.

From the opening moments peppered with thunder and a yard dog's barking, plus the almost constant sound of the television or radio, Robin Weatherall's sound design really sets the mood.  Costumes by Teresa Doggett blend perfectly along with Patrick Huber's terrific scenic and lighting design.

If you're like me, and you like sour candy, check it out.  Even if you don't like sour candy per se…  *sigh*  I'm still trying to work that metaphor.  Anyway, you won't be sorry.


Larry Dell (Ansel Smith), Missy Miller (Sharla Smith)
and Jason Cannon (Killer Joe Cooper).
Photo credit: John Lamb
KILLER JOE

Written by Tracy Letts 
Directed by Milton Zoth
The Gaslight Theater, 358 N. Boyle Ave.
through April 22 | tickets: $20 - $25
Performances Thursday to Saturday at 8pm, Sundays at 3pm

Cast:
James E. Slover (Chris Smith), Missy Miller (Sharla Smith), Larry Dell (Ansel Smith), Rachel Fenton (Dottie Smith) and Jason Cannon* (Killer Joe Cooper).
* Member Actors' Equity Association

Creative:
Scenic & lighting design by Patrick Huber; sound design by Robin Weatherall; costume design by Teresa Doggett; fight choreography by Brian Peters; scenic painter, Cristie Johnston; stage manager, Amy J. Paige.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

The Seventh Annual Kevin Kline Awards • Loretto-Hilton Center

I love this night.  I get to dress up (thanks, K9) and stare at the St. Louis actors I've admired all year.  Yes, I'm a geek, but I managed to gawk and point way less than last year.  And what do you know -- it's my 100th blog!!  Yay!  And if you can get a seat in front of Troy Turnipseed, do it.  He's a blast!

Here are the winners (in red) from this year's Seventh Annual Kevin Kline Awards.  Congrats to all!


Lifetime Achievement Award • Joe Schulte, veteran drama teacher and resident stage manager at the Muny

Outstanding Production for Young Audiences
"The Giver", Metro Theatre Company
"Chanticleer!", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis/Imaginary Theatre Company
"Trail of Tears", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis/Imaginary Theatre Company
"Cruel to be Kind?", Shakespeare Festival Education Tour
"Elves and the Shoemaker", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis/Imaginary Theatre Company

Outstanding New Play or Musical
"Till We Have Faces", Mustard Seed Theatre
"The Montford Point Marine", The Black Rep
"Falling", Mustard Seed Theatre
"The Winners", HotCity Theatre
"Hit-Story", OnSite Theatre

Outstanding Costume Design
Dorothy Marshall Englis, "In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Garth Dunbar, "Awake and Sing!", The New Jewish Theatre
Michele Siler, "The Death of Atahualpa", Upstream Theatre
Brad Muskgrove, "Disney’s 101 Dalmatians", Stages St. Louis
Teresa Doggett, "The Royal Family", Act Inc.
Dorothy Marshall Englis, "The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
Lou Bird, "Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis
JC Krajicek, "Palmer Park", St. Louis Actors’ Studio

Outstanding Lighting Design
Josh Smith, "The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
Matthew McCarthy, "The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
Phil Monat, "Red", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Matthew McCarthy, "Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis
Kirk Bookman & Steve O’Shea, "God of Carnage", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Robert M. Wierzel, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Set Design *3 Way-Tie
Scott C. Neale, "Cooking With Elisa", Upstream Theatre
Regina Garcia, "Ruined", The Black Rep
Gianni Downs, "In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Scott C. Neale, "Awake and Sing!", The New Jewish Theatre
Scott C. Neale, "The Taming of the Shrew", Shakespeare Festival St. Louis
Michael Ganio, "Red", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Sound Design
Rusty Wandall, "Macbeth", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Josh Limpert, "The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
Rusty Wandall, "Red", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Rusty Wandall, "Circle Mirror Transformation", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Daniel Baker & Aaron Meicht, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Ensemble Play *2 Way-Tie
"In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
"The Real McCoy", The Black Rep
"The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
"Circle Mirror Transformation", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
"The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play
Linda Kennedy, "Pericles", The Black Rep
Peggy Billo, "The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
Emily Baker, "Just Desserts", St. Louis Actor’s Studio
Julie Venegoni, "Savage in Limbo", OnSite Theatre
Linda Kennedy, "Blood Wedding", Upstream Theatre
Hayley Treider, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play
Bob Harvey, "The Price", Avalon Theatre Company
Chauncy Thomas, "The Real McCoy", The Black Rep
Jason Cannon, "Awake and Sing!", The New Jewish Theatre
Gary Wayne Barker, "The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
Jonathan Foster, "Falling", Mustard Seed Theatre

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Play
Andrea Frye, "Ruined", The Black Rep
Kari Ely, "Sirens", The New Jewish Theatre
Brooke Edwards, "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea", Non-Prophets
Michelle Hand, "Falling", Mustard Seed Theatre
Susan Louise O’Connor, "God of Carnage", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play
Gary Wayne Barker, "Shadowlands", Mustard Seed Theatre
J. Samuel Davis, "Ruined", The Black Rep
John Pierson, "Closer", St. Louis Actor’s Studio
Bobby Miller, "Awake and Sing!", The New Jewish Theatre
Bob Thibaut, "The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
Brian Dykstra, "Red", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Danny McCarthy, "Circle Mirror Transformation", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Director of a Play
Andrew Moodie, "The Real McCoy", The Black Rep
Edward Coffield, "The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
Steven Woolf, "Red", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Stuart Carden, "Circle Mirror Transformation", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Jeremy B. Cohen, "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Production of a Play *2 Way-Tie
"In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
"Awake and Sing!", The New Jewish Theatre
"The Immigrant", The New Jewish Theatre
"Red", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
"God of Carnage", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
"Circle Mirror Transformation", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Outstanding Musical Direction *2 Way-Tie
Michael Sebastian, "Beehive", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Charles Creath, "Black Pearl Sings!", The Black Rep
Lisa Campbell-Albert, "The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
Michael Horsley, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", The Muny
Joe Schoen, "Godspell", The Mustard Seed Theatre

Outstanding Choreography
Kelli Barclay, "Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
Dana Lewis, "The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
Pepper Clyde, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", The Muny
Dana Lewis, "Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis
Alicia Gbaho, "Black Nativity", The Black Rep

Outstanding Ensemble in a Musical
"Beehive", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
"Legally Blonde", The Muny
"Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
"Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", The Muny
"Godspell", The Mustard Seed Theatre

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical
Jessica Vaccaro, "A Chorus Line", Stages St. Louis
Michele Ragusa, "Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
Julia Cardia, "The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
Melinda Crown, "Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis
Amy Loui, "Godspell", The Mustard Seed Theatre

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical
Curtis Holbrock, "Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
Ken Page, "Little Shop of Horrors", The Muny
Lewis J. Stadlen, "Bye Bye Birdie", The Muny
Steve Judkins, "Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Musical
Lisa Estridge, "Beehive", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Debra Walton, "Beehive", The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis
Denise Thomas, "Black Pearl Sings!", The Black Rep
Alexis Kinney, "The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
Alli Mauzey, "Little Shop of Horrors", The Muny
Jenny Powers, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", The Muny

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Musical
Leigh Wakeford, "Disney’s 101 Dalmatians", Stages St. Louis
Tony Yazbeck, "Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
James Bleecker, "Thrill Me", Max & Louie Productions
David Schmittou, "Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis

Outstanding Director of a Musical
Andrea Frye, "Black Pearl Sings!", The Black Rep
Rick Conant, "Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
John Miller-Stephany, "Little Shop of Horrors", The Muny
Mark Schneider, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", The Muny
Deanna Jent, "Godspell", The Mustard Seed Theatre

Outstanding Production of a Musical
"Singin’ in the Rain", The Muny
"The Secret Garden", Stages St. Louis
"Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", The Muny
"Victor/Victoria", Stages St. Louis
"Godspell", The Mustard Seed Theatre

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